100+ Birds that Start with N for Discovering Noble Flyers!

Hey, fantastic friends! 

Are you ready to embark on a journey into the realm of birds whose names kick off with the letter ‘N’? 

It’s time to spread our wings and discover the delightful tales of our feathery friends!

Fascinating Birds that start with N

Buckle up because we’re about to dive into a feathered fiesta filled with charm, chirps, and maybe a touch of whimsy. 

From the nimble Nuthatch to the majestic Nene, these ‘N’ birds are like the cool kids of the avian world, bringing their own unique flair to the party. 

Let’s get started with the adventure!

Nacunda Nighthawk

Nacunda Nighthawk

With distinctive white markings on its wings, the Nacunda Nighthawk is a nocturnal aerial acrobat, effortlessly capturing insects in flight. Found in South America’s open grasslands, it skillfully navigates the night sky.

Habitat and Behavior: Thriving in savannas, it prefers vast, open spaces.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Breeding in monogamous pairs, females lay eggs on bare ground.

Fun Fact: Nacunda Nighthawks are known for their hauntingly beautiful, nocturnal calls.

Naga Wren-Babbler

Naga Wren-Babbler

The Naga Wren-Babbler, endemic to the Eastern Himalayas, boasts striking plumage, blending earthy tones with a vibrant chestnut crown. Agile in dense undergrowth, it forages for insects.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, often near water sources.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Breeding season sees intricate nest construction and parental cooperation.

Fun Fact: Naga Wren-Babblers communicate through a melodious, complex song repertoire.

Nahan’s Partridge

Nahan’s Partridge

Endangered and elusive, Nahan’s Partridge inhabits the Western Ghats, showcasing intricate black and chestnut patterns. Preferring dense forests, it relies on camouflage for protection.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits thick underbrush, displaying secretive behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Mating for life, females lay well-camouflaged eggs in concealed nests.

Fun Fact: Male Nahan’s Partridges engage in mesmerizing, synchronized duets during courtship.

Naked-Faced Barbet

Naked-Faced Barbet

With vibrant plumage and a distinctive lack of facial feathers, the Naked-Faced Barbet is a charismatic bird found in Southeast Asia’s tropical forests. It specializes in fruit-eating.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland rainforests, often near fruit-bearing trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Monogamous pairs construct tree hollow nests for brooding and raising chicks.

Fun Fact: Naked-Faced Barbets have a peculiar habit of sunbathing, exposing their bare facial skin.

Naked-Faced Spiderhunter

Naked-Faced Spiderhunter

Endemic to Borneo, the Naked-Faced Spiderhunter thrives in montane forests, featuring a distinctive bare facial patch. It employs its long, specialized bill for extracting nectar from flowers.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers high-altitude montane forests, displaying territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Females build cup-shaped nests for laying and incubating eggs.

Fun Fact: These spiderhunters are crucial pollinators for high-altitude flowering plants.

Namaqua Dove

Namaqua Dove

Adorned with intricate patterns, the Namaqua Dove is a desert-dwelling bird found in Africa. With muted hues, it expertly blends into arid landscapes, foraging for seeds.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in arid regions, often near water sources for hydration.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Exhibits monogamous breeding, with nests hidden among rocks or vegetation.

Fun Fact: Namaqua Doves can survive without drinking water, obtaining moisture from their diet.

Namaqua Sandgrouse

Namaqua Sandgrouse

A master of desert survival, the Namaqua Sandgrouse is equipped with specialized breast feathers for water retention during long flights. Found in arid African regions, it navigates vast landscapes.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers arid plains and desert regions, forming large flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Mating pairs construct simple nests on the ground for egg-laying.

Fun Fact: Male Namaqua Sandgrouse perform intricate water-carrying flights to provide hydration to their chicks.

Namaqua Warbler

Namaqua Warbler

Endemic to Namibia’s coastal areas, the Namaqua Warbler is a small, cryptic bird adept at navigating dense vegetation. Its subtle plumage aids in blending seamlessly with its habitat.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in dense coastal thickets, displaying skulking behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests are intricately woven in low vegetation, with both parents participating in care.

Fun Fact: Namaqua Warblers have a diverse repertoire of melodious, complex songs.

Namuli Apalis

Namuli Apalis

Endemic to Mount Namuli in Mozambique, the Namuli Apalis is a small, insectivorous bird with distinctive yellow and gray plumage. It is often found in mossy montane forests.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests with moss-covered trees, displaying agile foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Breeding pairs construct cup-shaped nests for laying eggs on elevated branches.

Fun Fact: The Namuli Apalis is perfectly adapted to its montane habitat, utilizing moss as nesting material.

Nanday Parakeet

Nanday Parakeet

The Nanday Parakeet, native to South America, is characterized by its striking green plumage and distinctive black facial markings. Highly adaptable, it thrives in diverse habitats.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits a range of environments, from forests to urban areas.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Monogamous pairs construct nests in tree hollows for raising chicks.

Fun Fact: Nanday Parakeets are known for their vocal mimicry, imitating a variety of sounds.

Nankeen Kestrel

Nankeen Kestrel

The Nankeen Kestrel, a common sight in Australia, boasts a rufous plumage and is often observed hovering over open landscapes. With keen eyesight, it hunts small mammals and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in open grasslands, displaying graceful hovering behavior during hunting.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or on cliffs, with pairs raising multiple broods annually.

Fun Fact: Nankeen Kestrels are known for their adept hunting skills, capturing prey mid-air.

Nankeen Night Heron

Nankeen Night Heron

With a cryptic plumage of orange and black, the Nankeen Night Heron is a nocturnal hunter found in Australia and Southeast Asia. It stealthily forages for fish and crustaceans.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers wetlands and mangroves, displaying solitary nocturnal foraging.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in colonies, with both parents participating in raising chicks.

Fun Fact: Nankeen Night Herons are known for their unique courtship displays involving stretching and bill-clattering.

Napo Sabrewing

Napo Sabrewing

Endemic to the Amazon Basin, the Napo Sabrewing is a hummingbird species with vibrant iridescent plumage and a distinctive sabre-shaped bill. It is an agile feeder, sipping nectar from flowers.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits tropical rainforests, displaying territorial behavior around flowering trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Females construct cup-shaped nests on high branches for laying eggs.

Fun Fact: Napo Sabrewings are known for their precise hovering, allowing them to access nectar from intricate flowers.

Narcissus Flycatcher

Narcissus Flycatcher

The Narcissus Flycatcher, a migratory bird, showcases dazzling yellow and black plumage during the breeding season. It is found in East Asia, frequenting dense woodlands.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers deciduous forests, showcasing agile aerial hunting for insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Females construct cup-shaped nests on tree branches for egg-laying.

Fun Fact: Male Narcissus Flycatchers change their plumage color during migration, adopting a more inconspicuous appearance.

Narcondam Hornbill

Narcondam Hornbill

Endemic to the Narcondam Island in the Indian Ocean, the Narcondam Hornbill is a large, forest-dwelling bird known for its striking black and white plumage and distinctive casque.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits tropical forests, displaying strong territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Breeding pairs nest in tree hollows, participating in incubation and chick-rearing.

Fun Fact: Narcondam Hornbills play a vital role in forest regeneration by dispersing seeds through their droppings.

Naretha Bluebonnet

Naretha Bluebonnet

The Naretha Bluebonnet, a parrot species endemic to Australia, features vibrant blue and green plumage with striking yellow facial markings. It thrives in arid woodlands.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits open woodlands, displaying nomadic behavior in search of food.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Forms monogamous pairs, constructing nests in tree hollows for raising chicks.

Fun Fact: Naretha Bluebonnets are skilled mimics, imitating a variety of sounds, including other bird species.

Narina Trogon

Narina Trogon

Adorned in iridescent green and crimson, the Narina Trogon graces the forests of sub-Saharan Africa. Its melodious calls echo through dense canopies, marking its presence in the vibrant avian tapestry.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lush woodlands, displaying agile flight and perching behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Females construct tree hollow nests, laying a clutch of vividly hued eggs.

Fun Fact: Narina Trogons are skilled hunters, capturing insects mid-air with remarkable precision.

Nariño Tapaculo

Nariño Tapaculo

Endemic to the Andes of South America, the Nariño Tapaculo is a secretive, ground-dwelling bird with cryptic plumage. Its unique vocalizations resonate in the mossy undergrowth, creating an aura of mystery.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in dense, montane vegetation, displaying elusive behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Builds cup-shaped nests hidden among thick vegetation for safeguarding eggs.

Fun Fact: Nariño Tapaculos are known for their synchronized, complex duets during the breeding season.

Narrow-Billed Antwren

Narrow-Billed Antwren

A tiny forest-dweller of the Amazon, the Narrow-Billed Antwren sports subtle plumage and an agile demeanor. Flocking with mixed-species foraging groups, it navigates the understory with finesse.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers lowland rainforests, actively participating in mixed-species foraging flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs compact, cup-shaped nests for laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Narrow-Billed Antwrens engage in cooperative breeding, with non-breeding individuals assisting in raising chicks.

Narrow-Billed Tody

Narrow-Billed Tody

Residing in the Caribbean, the Narrow-Billed Tody is a vibrant, miniature marvel with iridescent plumage. It daintily flits from branch to branch, hunting insects with its slender bill.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and mangroves, showcasing agile, acrobatic hunting maneuvers.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree cavities, with females laying a few tiny, speckled eggs.

Fun Fact: Despite its diminutive size, the Narrow-Billed Tody is known for its bold and fearless nature.

Narrow-Billed Woodcreeper

Narrow-Billed Woodcreeper

Camouflaged amidst bark textures, the Narrow-Billed Woodcreeper is a master of vertical exploration in South American forests. Its slender bill probes for insects along tree trunks and branches.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers dense tropical forests, adept at climbing and probing for insect prey.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests on tree branches for laying eggs.

Fun Fact: Narrow-Billed Woodcreepers are integral to forest ecosystems, controlling insect populations through their foraging habits.

Narrow-Tailed Emerald

Narrow-Tailed Emerald

Inhabiting the Andes and Central America, the Narrow-Tailed Emerald is a jewel-like hummingbird with a slender, iridescent tail. It hovers gracefully, sipping nectar from vibrant blooms.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, showcasing agile hovering and territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructing tiny, cup-shaped nests, females lay minuscule eggs on high branches.

Fun Fact: Narrow-Tailed Emeralds are essential pollinators, fostering the diversity of high-altitude flora.

Narrow-Tailed Starling

Narrow-Tailed Starling

Endemic to New Guinea, the Narrow-Tailed Starling dazzles with glossy black plumage and iridescent green highlights. It forms large, chatty flocks, creating a captivating spectacle against the forest canopy.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, displaying synchronized flocking behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree cavities, with communal roosting spaces for large, social groups.

Fun Fact: Narrow-Tailed Starlings are adept mimics, incorporating various sounds into their vocal repertoire.

Nashville Warbler

Nashville Warbler

A neotropical migrant, the Nashville Warbler journeys across North America, displaying a distinctive yellow throat and crown. It forages among foliage, capturing insects with remarkable agility.

Habitat and Behavior: Nests in boreal and deciduous forests, actively foraging in shrubs and trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests, with females laying eggs in concealed locations.

Fun Fact: Nashville Warblers exhibit ‘traplining’ behavior, systematically visiting specific flowers for nectar and insects.

Natal Spurfowl

Natal Spurfowl

Endemic to South Africa, the Natal Spurfowl is a ground-dwelling bird with intricate plumage patterns. It forages in open grasslands, using its powerful legs to swiftly navigate the terrain.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in grassy habitats, often forming coveys for communal foraging.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on the ground, with both parents involved in incubation and chick-rearing.

Fun Fact: Natal Spurfowls are known for their distinctive ‘chink-chink’ calls, echoing across grassy landscapes.

Natterer’s Slaty Antshrike

Natterer’s Slaty Antshrike

In the neotropical realms, Natterer’s Slaty Antshrike is a stealthy predator with subdued plumage, adept at capturing insects in the understory. Its sharp bill is tailored for precision strikes.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits dense forests, often following ant swarms for insect foraging.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs concealed, cup-shaped nests for laying eggs in the forest undergrowth.

Fun Fact: Natterer’s Slaty Antshrikes engage in cooperative breeding, with helpers aiding in raising the young.

Naumann’s Thrush

Naumann’s Thrush

Migrating across Asia, Naumann’s Thrush showcases a subtle blend of brown and gray plumage. It frequents open woodlands and gardens, foraging on the ground for insects and berries.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers a variety of wooded habitats, displaying ground-foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in trees, with females laying eggs in well-hidden locations.

Fun Fact: Naumann’s Thrushes exhibit nomadic behavior during migration, seeking out diverse habitats for foraging.

Naung Mung Scimitar Babbler

Naung Mung Scimitar Babbler

Endemic to Southeast Asia, the Naung Mung Scimitar Babbler is a forest-dwelling species with a distinctive scimitar-shaped bill. It navigates dense undergrowth, emitting melodious calls that resonate through its habitat.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in subtropical and montane forests, showcasing secretive behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs intricate nests hidden among thick vegetation, with both parents involved in care.

Fun Fact: Naung Mung Scimitar Babblers are known for their synchronized vocalizations, creating a harmonic symphony in the forest.

Nauru Reed Warbler

Endemic to the Pacific island of Nauru, the Nauru Reed Warbler is a small songbird with a subtle brown plumage. Found in dense reed beds, its melodious trills echo across the island’s unique ecosystem.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in marshes and reed beds, exhibiting agile and secretive behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests amidst tall reeds, with females laying a few eggs.

Fun Fact: Nauru Reed Warblers are excellent mimics, incorporating a variety of sounds into their repertoire.

Nava’s Wren

Endemic to Mexico, Nava’s Wren is a charismatic bird with distinctive black-and-white plumage. It thrives in arid scrublands, where its melodic songs contribute to the desert’s symphony.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits arid scrublands, showcasing active foraging and singing behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in low vegetation, with females laying multiple eggs in each clutch.

Fun Fact: Nava’s Wrens engage in duet singing, creating harmonious vocal displays with their mates.

Nazca Booby

Residing in the Pacific, the Nazca Booby is a striking seabird known for its stark white plumage and distinctive black facial mask. It nests on remote islands, demonstrating exceptional aerial prowess during fishing expeditions.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers tropical and subtropical oceanic islands, displaying synchronized group nesting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Breeds in large colonies, laying a single egg per nesting attempt.

Fun Fact: Nazca Boobies have specialized air sacs that cushion their body during high-impact dives into the ocean.

Neblina Metaltail

In the high-altitude cloud forests of the Andes, the Neblina Metaltail is a hummingbird species adorned with iridescent plumage. It hovers among moss-covered trees, sipping nectar from exquisite blooms.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane cloud forests, showcasing agile hovering and territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs tiny, cup-shaped nests on high branches, laying one or two eggs.

Fun Fact: Neblina Metaltails are vital pollinators for high-altitude flowering plants, contributing to ecosystem diversity.

Neblina Tapaculo

Endemic to the mist-shrouded mountains of South America, the Neblina Tapaculo is a cryptic bird, expertly camouflaged in the undergrowth. Its unique vocalizations resonate through the cloud forests.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits dense montane forests, displaying elusive behavior in the understory.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs concealed nests on the ground, with females laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Neblina Tapaculos have distinct, ventriloquial calls, creating a challenge for birdwatchers to locate them.

Nechisar Nightjar

Endemic to Ethiopia, the Nechisar Nightjar is a nocturnal marvel with intricate patterns and cryptic plumage. It emerges at dusk, skillfully capturing insects in flight with its wide gape.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in arid and rocky landscapes, displaying crepuscular and nocturnal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on the ground, with females laying well-camouflaged eggs in rocky crevices.

Fun Fact: Nechisar Nightjars have specialized feathers that aid in silent flight, enhancing their nocturnal hunting prowess.

Necklaced Barbet

Necklaced Barbet

Found in Southeast Asia, the Necklaced Barbet is a colorful bird with distinctive black and yellow markings. It thrives in tropical forests, where its vibrant plumage adds a burst of color to the canopy.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits tropical and subtropical forests, displaying active foraging and vocal behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Excavates nest holes in tree trunks, with both parents participating in chick-rearing.

Fun Fact: Necklaced Barbets are skilled fruit eaters, with their diet contributing to forest regeneration through seed dispersal.

Necklaced Spinetail

Necklaced Spinetail

Endemic to South America, the Necklaced Spinetail is a slender bird with intricate neck markings. It navigates through dense vegetation, utilizing its long tail as a stabilizing rudder.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits tropical and subtropical forests, displaying agile and secretive foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs globular nests with an entrance tube, often hidden in dense foliage.

Fun Fact: Necklaced Spinetails are known for their synchronized aerial displays during courtship.

Neddicky

Neddicky

Native to sub-Saharan Africa, the Neddicky is a small, plain-colored bird with a melodious song. It frequents savannas and grasslands, contributing to the acoustic richness of its habitat.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in open grasslands, often perching on elevated spots for singing.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests in low vegetation, laying a few eggs.

Fun Fact: Neddickies are territorial singers, and their vocalizations play a role in defining territory boundaries.

Needle-Billed Hermit

Inhabiting Central and South America, the Needle-Billed Hermit is a hummingbird with an exceptionally long, straight bill. It expertly feeds on nectar from flowers, showcasing remarkable adaptation for specialized foraging.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers tropical and subtropical forests, displaying agile hovering and territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs tiny, cup-shaped nests in high branches, laying a single egg.

Fun Fact: Needle-Billed Hermits have a mutualistic relationship with certain flowering plants, aiding in pollination as they feed.

Neergaard’s Sunbird

Neergaard's Sunbird

Endemic to the Arabian Peninsula, Neergaard’s Sunbird is a vibrant bird with iridescent plumage. It frequents arid and semi-arid habitats, where its brilliant colors contrast with the desert landscape.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits arid scrublands, showcasing agile hovering and territorial behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in shrubs, with females laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Neergaard’s Sunbirds are known for their iridescent throat patches, which play a role in courtship displays.

Negros Bleeding-Heart Pigeon

Negros Bleeding-Heart Pigeon

Endangered and endemic to the Philippines, the Negros Bleeding-Heart Pigeon is named for its striking red “bleeding” patch on its chest. It resides in montane forests, adding vibrancy to its native habitat.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, often foraging on the ground for seeds and fruits.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in trees, with females laying a single egg in each breeding attempt.

Fun Fact: Negros Bleeding-Heart Pigeons have a mournful, cooing call that resonates through the forest.

Negros Fruit Dove

Negros Fruit Dove

Also endemic to the Philippines, the Negros Fruit Dove is a colorful species with vibrant plumage. It inhabits forests, where it feasts on a diverse array of fruits, contributing to seed dispersal.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers lowland and montane forests, displaying arboreal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs simple nests on tree branches, laying one or two eggs.

Fun Fact: Negros Fruit Doves play a crucial role in maintaining forest biodiversity through their feeding habits.

Negros Leaf Warbler

Negros Leaf Warbler

Endemic to the Philippines, the Negros Leaf Warbler is a small, subtly colored bird that flits through the canopies of montane forests. Its distinctive calls and intricate plumage add to the diversity of avian life.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, showcasing active and acrobatic foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests in dense vegetation, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: Negros Leaf Warblers are adept at capturing insects in flight, showcasing their agile hunting skills.

Negros Scops Owl

Negros Scops Owl

Endemic to the Philippines, the Negros Scops Owl is a nocturnal hunter with distinct tufted ear-tufts. Inhabiting montane forests, its haunting calls pierce the night, adding an air of mystery to the island’s biodiversity.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, roosting in dense foliage during daylight hours.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: Negros Scops Owls are masters of camouflage, blending seamlessly with the bark of trees during the day.

Negros Striped Babbler

Negros Striped Babbler

The Negros Striped Babbler, endemic to the Philippines, is a lively songbird adorned with distinct black-and-white stripes. It forages in dense undergrowth, contributing to the lively avian chorus of Negros Island.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits dense scrub and forest undergrowth, displaying gregarious and vocal behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Builds cup-shaped nests in low vegetation, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: Negros Striped Babblers are skilled at creating intricate, woven nests using plant fibers.

Nelicourvi Weaver

Nelicourvi Weaver

Endemic to Mauritius and Réunion, the Nelicourvi Weaver is a charming bird with a vibrant yellow plumage and distinctive eye markings. It frequents coastal habitats, where its intricate nests adorn the trees.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in coastal areas, displaying agile foraging behavior and intricate nest-building skills.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs pendant-shaped nests, with females laying eggs in the protected woven chambers.

Fun Fact: Nelicourvi Weavers are known for their synchronized courtship displays involving elaborate nest-building rituals.

Nelson’s Sparrow

Nelson’s Sparrow

Nelson’s Sparrow, a North American songbird, boasts subtle tones of gray and orange. It breeds in wetlands, where its distinctive song resonates through the marshes and grassy expanses.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers saltmarshes and wet meadows, showcasing secretive and ground-foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in dense vegetation, with females laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Nelson’s Sparrows undertake long migrations, covering impressive distances during their seasonal journeys.

Nene

Nene

Endemic to Hawaii, the Nene, or Hawaiian Goose, is a symbol of conservation success. Recovering from near-extinction, it now thrives in volcanic landscapes, showcasing its distinctive appearance with a pronounced beak.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits volcanic slopes and grasslands, often forming family groups.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in shallow depressions, with both parents involved in protecting and raising goslings.

Fun Fact: The Nene is the world’s rarest goose species, emblematic of successful conservation efforts.

Neotropic Cormorant

Neotropic Cormorant

Spread across the Americas, the Neotropic Cormorant is a waterbird known for its sleek black plumage and long, slender neck. It frequents freshwater habitats, showcasing expert diving and swimming abilities.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers lakes and rivers, displaying skilled diving and swimming behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in colonies, with both parents actively involved in raising chicks.

Fun Fact: Neotropic Cormorants are known to sunbathe with wings outstretched to dry their feathers after diving.

Neotropical Palm Swift

Neotropical Palm Swift

Inhabiting Central and South America, the Neotropical Palm Swift is a small bird with distinctive crescent-shaped wings. It expertly navigates the skies above palm groves, where it catches insects in flight.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in tropical lowland areas, showcasing agile aerial foraging and roosting in palm trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs tiny nests on palm fronds, laying eggs in a secure, cup-shaped structure.

Fun Fact: Neotropical Palm Swifts have specialized toe adaptations for clinging to vertical surfaces.

Nepal Cupwing

Nepal Cupwing

Endemic to the Himalayan region, the Nepal Cupwing is a skulking bird with an unassuming appearance. It frequents dense undergrowth, where its distinctive cup-shaped nests are hidden from view.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, displaying secretive behavior in the understory.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests on or near the ground, laying a few eggs.

Fun Fact: Nepal Cupwings are named for their cup-like nest structure, crafted with finesse from plant fibers.

Nepal Fulvetta

Nepal Fulvetta

The Nepal Fulvetta, found in the Himalayas, is a sociable bird with a brown and white plumage. It thrives in dense vegetation, where its melodious calls contribute to the mountainous chorus.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, often foraging in mixed-species flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Builds cup-shaped nests hidden in dense foliage, with females laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Nepal Fulvettas engage in cooperative breeding, with group members assisting in raising chicks.

Nepal House Martin

Nepal House Martin

Endemic to the Himalayas, the Nepal House Martin is a streamlined bird with a distinctive white rump. It skilfully navigates the skies above mountainous landscapes, adept at catching insects in flight.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in mountainous regions, nesting on cliffs and buildings, displaying agile aerial foraging.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs mud nests on cliffs or human-made structures, laying eggs in cup-shaped depressions.

Fun Fact: Nepal House Martins are known for their long-distance migrations, covering vast distances during seasonal movements.

Neumann’s Starling

Neumann’s Starling

Endemic to Africa, Neumann’s Starling is a glossy, iridescent bird with a distinctive yellow eye-ring. It frequents open woodlands, where its raucous calls and agile flight add vibrancy to the avian community.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits savannas and open woodlands, often foraging in flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree cavities or on cliffs, with females laying multiple eggs.

Fun Fact: Neumann’s Starlings are expert imitators, mimicking the calls of other bird species in their surroundings.

Neumann’s Warbler

Neumann’s Warbler

The Neumann’s Warbler, found in East Africa, is a subtly colored bird with a distinctive face pattern. It inhabits montane forests, where its presence is marked by soft, melodious songs.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, often foraging in the mid-story and understory.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests hidden among foliage, with females laying small clutches of eggs.

Fun Fact: Neumann’s Warblers engage in complex duets during the breeding season, strengthening pair bonds.

New Britain Boobook

New Britain Boobook

Endemic to New Britain, the New Britain Boobook is a nocturnal owl with a striking dark plumage. It roosts in dense vegetation during the day and hunts small mammals and birds at night.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, displaying nocturnal hunting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or dense foliage, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Britain Boobooks have keen hearing, aiding them in locating prey in the dark.

New Britain Bronzewing

New Britain Bronzewing

The New Britain Bronzewing, native to the islands of Papua New Guinea, is a pigeon species with a distinct bronze sheen on its plumage. It forages on the forest floor for seeds and fruits.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, often feeding on the ground.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs simple nests in trees, laying one or two eggs.

Fun Fact: New Britain Bronzewings play a role in forest regeneration through their seed dispersal activities.

New Britain Dwarf Kingfisher

New Britain Dwarf Kingfisher

Endemic to New Britain, the New Britain Dwarf Kingfisher is a vibrant bird with colorful plumage. It frequents the dense undergrowth of forests, where it captures insects and small invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, displaying agile and secretive foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or concealed locations, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Britain Dwarf Kingfishers are known for their rapid and direct flight, enabling efficient hunting.

New Britain Friarbird

New Britain Friarbird

Found in the Bismarck Archipelago, the New Britain Friarbird is a large honeyeater with distinct facial wattles. It forages in the forest canopy, feeding on nectar and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, showcasing active and vocal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tall trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Britain Friarbirds play a role in pollination as they feed on nectar from flowering plants.

New Britain Goshawk

New Britain Goshawk

Endemic to New Britain, the New Britain Goshawk is a raptor species with a powerful build and sharp talons. It soars above the forests, hunting for birds and small mammals.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, displaying skilled aerial hunting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree canopies, with both parents involved in raising chicks.

Fun Fact: New Britain Goshawks are known for their swift and agile flight, making them efficient predators.

New Britain Pitta

New Britain Pitta

The New Britain Pitta, native to New Britain, is a brightly colored bird with a mix of vibrant hues. It resides in the dense undergrowth of forests, where its distinctive calls echo through the foliage.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in lowland and montane forests, showcasing ground-foraging and secretive behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations on the forest floor, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Britain Pittas are known for their intricate courtship displays, involving various vocalizations and movements.

New Britain Sparrowhawk

New Britain Sparrowhawk

Endemic to New Britain, the New Britain Sparrowhawk is a raptor species known for its swift and agile flight. It gracefully soars above the forests, preying on birds and small mammals.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, showcasing skilled aerial hunting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree canopies, with both parents actively involved in raising chicks.

Fun Fact: New Britain Sparrowhawks are adept at navigating dense vegetation during high-speed pursuits.

New Caledonian Crow

New Caledonian Crow

Endemic to New Caledonia, the New Caledonian Crow is renowned for its remarkable problem-solving abilities and tool-making skills. Its intelligent and adaptive behavior sets it apart in the avian world.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits a variety of environments, showcasing tool use for foraging and hunting.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tall trees, with both parents participating in raising and educating offspring.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Crows have demonstrated the ability to create and use tools, showcasing advanced cognitive capabilities.

New Caledonian Cuckooshrike

New Caledonian Cuckooshrike

The New Caledonian Cuckooshrike is a striking passerine bird with distinctive black and white plumage. Endemic to New Caledonia, it frequents forests and woodlands, showcasing agile hunting maneuvers.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, displaying active foraging behavior in the canopy.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree branches, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Cuckooshrikes are skilled insect hunters, capturing prey mid-air with precision.

New Caledonian Friarbird

New Caledonian Friarbird

The New Caledonian Friarbird, native to the archipelago, is a large honeyeater with a distinctive facial patch. It plays a vital role in pollination and seed dispersal as it feeds on nectar and fruits.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in diverse habitats, showcasing active and vocal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tall trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Friarbirds have brush-tipped tongues, ideal for extracting nectar from flowers.

New Caledonian Lorikeet

New Caledonian Lorikeet

Endemic to New Caledonia, the New Caledonian Lorikeet is a vibrantly colored parrot species. It frequents forests and gardens, displaying agile flight and raucous calls.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits a variety of habitats, often foraging in tree canopies for nectar and fruit.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Lorikeets are known for their acrobatic flight and playful social interactions.

New Caledonian Myzomela

New Caledonian Myzomela

The New Caledonian Myzomela is a small bird endemic to the islands, adorned with striking red and black plumage. It forages on nectar and insects, contributing to ecosystem dynamics.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in various habitats, showcasing agile and territorial foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Myzomelas play a role in pollination as they feed on nectar from flowering plants.

New Caledonian Nightjar

New Caledonian Nightjar

Endemic to New Caledonia, the New Caledonian Nightjar is a nocturnal bird with cryptic plumage, expertly camouflaged against the forest floor. It emerges at dusk to hunt insects in flight.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, displaying crepuscular and nocturnal hunting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on the ground, with females laying well-camouflaged eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Nightjars have specialized feathers that aid in silent flight, enhancing their nocturnal hunting prowess.

New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjar

New Caledonian Nightjar

The New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjar is a unique and elusive bird endemic to New Caledonia. It inhabits dense forests, where its cryptic plumage and nocturnal habits make it a challenging sighting.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, showcasing elusive and nocturnal behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations on the forest floor, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Owlet-Nightjars are known for their distinctive calls, echoing through the night.

New Caledonian Parakeet

New Caledonian Parakeet

Endemic to New Caledonia, the New Caledonian Parakeet is a brightly colored bird with a distinctive red face. It frequents a variety of habitats, showcasing agile flight and social behaviors.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits diverse environments, often foraging in tree canopies for seeds and fruits.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Parakeets are known for their raucous calls and vibrant social interactions.

New Caledonian Whistler

New Caledonian Whistler

Endemic to New Caledonia, the New Caledonian Whistler is a songbird with a melodious repertoire. It thrives in various habitats, contributing to the diverse avian chorus of the archipelago.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits montane forests, often foraging in mixed-species flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Builds cup-shaped nests hidden in dense foliage, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Caledonian Whistlers are adept at mimicking other bird species, adding complexity to their vocalizations.

New Georgia Dwarf Kingfisher

New Georgia Dwarf Kingfisher

The New Georgia Dwarf Kingfisher, native to the Solomon Islands, is a diminutive kingfisher with vibrant plumage. It frequents the forest understory, hunting for insects and small invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, displaying agile and secretive foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or concealed locations, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Georgia Dwarf Kingfishers have specialized bills for capturing and consuming small prey.

New Guinea Flightless Rail

New Guinea Flightless Rail

The New Guinea Flightless Rail, as its name suggests, is a ground-dwelling bird with reduced flight capabilities. It resides in the dense vegetation of New Guinea, foraging for invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits dense forests, often foraging on the ground for insects and small invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations on the forest floor, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Guinea Flightless Rails are expert runners, using their strong legs to navigate the forest floor.

New Guinea Friarbird

New Guinea Friarbird

The New Guinea Friarbird, native to the island of New Guinea, is a large honeyeater with a distinct bald head and facial wattles. It forages in diverse habitats, contributing to pollination and seed dispersal.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in varied environments, showcasing active and vocal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tall trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Guinea Friarbirds have specialized brush-tipped tongues for efficient nectar extraction.

New Guinea Scrubfowl

New Guinea Scrubfowl

The New Guinea Scrubfowl, a ground-dwelling bird, is known for its remarkable nesting behavior. It builds massive mound nests where the heat generated during decomposition incubates the eggs.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, often foraging on the ground for insects and seeds.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs large mound nests, with the heat aiding in incubation, and females laying multiple eggs.

Fun Fact: New Guinea Scrubfowls are expert mound architects, carefully regulating nest temperature for successful incubation.

New Guinea Thornbill

New Guinea Thornbill

Endemic to New Guinea, the New Guinea Thornbill is a small, active songbird with a distinctive upturned bill. It flits through the canopy, contributing to the avian diversity of the island.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in montane forests, often foraging in mixed-species flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests hidden among dense foliage, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Guinea Thornbills have specialized bills for probing bark and foliage in search of insects.

New Guinea Woodcock

New Guinea Woodcock

The New Guinea Woodcock, a unique shorebird, is known for its cryptic plumage and long, slender bill. It frequents wetlands and marshes, showcasing remarkable camouflage.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits wetlands, displaying crepuscular and nocturnal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on the ground, with females laying well-camouflaged eggs.

Fun Fact: New Guinea Woodcocks have sensitive bills, allowing them to locate prey by touch in low-light conditions.

New Holland Honeyeater

New Holland Honeyeater

The New Holland Honeyeater, native to Australia, is a charismatic bird with black and white plumage and a distinctive yellow patch behind the eye. It forages on nectar and insects in diverse habitats.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in various environments, showcasing agile and vocal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in shrubs or trees, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Holland Honeyeaters play a crucial role in pollination, visiting a variety of flowering plants.

New Ireland Boobook

New Ireland Boobook

Endemic to New Ireland, the New Ireland Boobook is a nocturnal owl with a distinct call. It resides in forests, where its cryptic plumage aids in daytime roosting.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits forests and woodlands, displaying nocturnal hunting behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or concealed locations, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Ireland Boobooks have territorial calls that echo through the night, defining their presence.

New Ireland Dwarf Kingfisher

New Ireland Dwarf Kingfisher

The New Ireland Dwarf Kingfisher, native to the island, is a diminutive and colorful bird. It frequents the forest understory, capturing insects and small invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits lowland and montane forests, displaying agile and secretive foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows or concealed locations, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Ireland Dwarf Kingfishers have vibrant plumage, adding a burst of color to the forest.

New Ireland Friarbird

New Ireland Friarbird

Endemic to New Ireland, the New Ireland Friarbird is a large honeyeater with a distinct bald head and facial wattles. It forages in diverse habitats, contributing to pollination and seed dispersal.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in varied environments, showcasing active and vocal foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tall trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Ireland Friarbirds have specialized brush-tipped tongues for efficient nectar extraction.

New Ireland Myzomela

New Ireland Myzomela

The New Ireland Myzomela is a small bird with vibrant plumage endemic to New Ireland. It forages on nectar and insects, contributing to the ecological balance of the island.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in various habitats, showcasing agile and territorial foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in trees, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Ireland Myzomelas play a role in pollination as they feed on nectar from flowering plants.

New Zealand Bellbird

New Zealand Bellbird

The New Zealand Bellbird, or Korimako, is a melodious songbird endemic to New Zealand. With a vibrant green plumage, it frequents forests, contributing to the iconic soundscape of the islands.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits diverse environments, often foraging in tree canopies for nectar and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests hidden among foliage, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Bellbirds are known for their complex and melodious songs, audible over long distances.

New Zealand Bittern

New Zealand Bittern

The New Zealand Bittern, or Matuku, is a secretive and cryptically plumaged bird. It resides in wetlands, where its presence is often revealed by its booming calls during the breeding season.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits wetlands and marshes, displaying elusive and solitary behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations within reed beds, with females laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Bitterns have specialized calls, reminiscent of the sound of a bittern drumming, during courtship displays.

New Zealand Dotterel

New Zealand Dotterel

The New Zealand Dotterel, or Tuturiwhatu, is a shorebird endemic to New Zealand. With its distinctive chestnut plumage, it frequents sandy shores, playing a crucial role in coastal ecosystems.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits sandy beaches and dunes, often foraging for invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in scrapes in the sand, with both parents sharing incubation and chick-rearing duties.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Dotterels are highly vulnerable to predation, prompting conservation efforts to protect their nesting sites.

New Zealand Falcon

New Zealand Falcon

The New Zealand Falcon, or Kārearea, is a native raptor known for its agility in flight and fierce hunting prowess. Inhabiting various landscapes, it is a symbol of both strength and adaptability.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in diverse environments, showcasing aerial hunting skills and nesting on cliffs.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations, with both parents actively involved in raising chicks.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Falcons are adept at capturing prey mid-air, displaying remarkable aerial acrobatics.

New Zealand Fantail

New Zealand Fantail

The New Zealand Fantail, or Pīwakawaka, is a charismatic bird with a distinctive fanned tail. It flits through forests, foraging for insects, and is known for its friendly interactions with humans.

Habitat and Behavior: Thrives in various environments, often foraging in the forest understory with agile and playful flight.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Fantails are considered companions by some Māori, believed to bring news from the spiritual realm.

New Zealand Fernbird

New Zealand Fernbird

The New Zealand Fernbird, or Mātātā, is a secretive songbird known for its elusive nature. It hides in dense vegetation, its distinctive calls adding a melodic touch to wetland environments.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits wetlands and dense shrubbery, showcasing skulking behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests hidden in tall grass, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Fernbirds have a talent for mimicking other bird species, adding complexity to their vocal repertoire.

New Zealand Grebe

New Zealand Grebe

The New Zealand Grebe, or Weweia, is a waterbird endemic to the country. With striking plumage and a distinctive neck-pumping display, it thrives in freshwater lakes and ponds.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers freshwater habitats, displaying diving and swimming behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on floating platforms, with both parents actively involved in incubation and chick care.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Grebes are expert divers, with their feet positioned at the rear of their bodies for streamlined swimming.

New Zealand Kaka

New Zealand Kaka

The New Zealand Kaka, a forest parrot, is known for its vibrant plumage and raucous calls. Thriving in native forests, it plays a vital role in seed dispersal and is recognized for its intelligence.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits native forests, showcasing agile flight and social interactions.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in tree hollows, laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Kakas are adept at using tools, showcasing problem-solving skills in captivity.

New Zealand King Shag

New Zealand King Shag

Endemic to New Zealand, the King Shag is a distinctive seabird with striking black and white plumage. It nests on coastal cliffs, contributing to the diversity of the country’s marine avifauna.

Habitat and Behavior: Nests on coastal rocks, displaying skilled diving and swimming behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs nests on rocky ledges, with both parents participating in chick-rearing.

Fun Fact: New Zealand King Shags are known for their synchronized courtship displays, involving elaborate head and neck movements.

New Zealand Quail

New Zealand Quail

The New Zealand Quail, or Kākāpō, is a ground-dwelling bird that faced significant decline but is subject to conservation efforts. Endearing and nocturnal, it is a symbol of resilience.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits grasslands and shrubbery, displaying ground-dwelling and nocturnal behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests on the ground, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Quails are critically endangered, and conservation measures aim to protect and increase their population.

New Zealand Rock Wren

New Zealand Rock Wren

The New Zealand Rock Wren, or Piwauwau, is a small, alpine songbird with intricate plumage. Thriving in mountainous regions, it navigates rocky terrain with agility, contributing to the biodiversity of alpine ecosystems.

Habitat and Behavior: Inhabits alpine and rocky landscapes, showcasing agile and acrobatic foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs cup-shaped nests hidden among rock crevices, laying a small number of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Rock Wrens are known for their resilience in harsh alpine environments, enduring cold temperatures.

New Zealand Scaup

New Zealand Scaup

The New Zealand Scaup, or Papango, is a freshwater diving duck found in lakes and ponds across the country. Recognized by its striking black and white plumage, it is an adept swimmer.

Habitat and Behavior: Prefers freshwater lakes, displaying skilled diving and swimming behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Nests in concealed locations near water, with females laying a small clutch of eggs.

Fun Fact: New Zealand Scaups are known for their synchronized courtship displays, involving elaborate head and body movements.

New Zealand Storm Petrel

New Zealand Storm Petrel

The New Zealand Storm Petrel is a seabird that was once considered extinct but rediscovered in 2003. It breeds on remote islands, displaying agile flight and distinctive vocalizations.

Habitat and Behavior: Nests on remote islands, showcasing skilled aerial foraging behavior.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Constructs burrows for nesting, laying a single egg.

Fun Fact: The rediscovery of the New Zealand Storm Petrel highlights the importance of continued conservation efforts for seabirds.

Conclusion

And there you have it, pals – our delightful escapade into the enchanting universe of ‘N’ birds! 

Didn’t we have a blast hanging out with the Nuthatch’s acrobatics and the elegant Noddies gliding over the waves? 

Happy birdwatching, buddies! 

Birds That Start With N

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