81+ Birds that Start with H that Are Amazing!

Hello, little fact lovers!! Today, let us learn about the attractive facts of the unique birds that start with the letter K!

From the unique and colorful hummingbirds to some extinct birds, these world-famous birds will definitely attract your attention! So, let’s explore…

Table of Contents

Fascinating Birds That Start With H

Let us explore the unique abilities of some amazing birds that start with the letter H.

Hadada Ibis

Hadada Ibis

The Hadada Ibis, with a long-curved beak and a loud call, roams Africa’s grasslands. Its appearance is striking! With its loud, distinct call, it’s often heard before it’s seen, foraging in grasslands and wetlands.

Habitat and Behavior: Found near water, they strut around in small groups, searching for insects and frogs.

Lifespan and Reproduction: These ibises can live up to 20 years and nest in trees, laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: They make a “ha-ha-ha-de-dah” sound, giving them their amusing name!

Hainan Blue Flycatcher

Hainan Blue Flycatcher

This small bird, with vibrant blue feathers, flits among Hainan’s forests, catching insects on the fly! It perches in low vegetation, darting out to catch insects in flight.

Habitat and Behavior: It lives in dense foliage, darting around to catch bugs with its quick moves.

Lifespan and Reproduction: The blue flycatcher lives around 5-7 years and builds cup-shaped nests.

Fun Fact: They sing beautiful songs to attract mates and defend their territories!

Hainan Leaf Warbler

Hainan Leaf Warbler

The Hainan Leaf Warbler, a tiny bird in shades of green, flutters amidst Hainan’s lush forests. With olive-brown plumage, it flits among trees, hunting insects.

Habitat and Behavior: It thrives in treetops, hunting insects with swift movements and chirping melodies.

Lifespan and Reproduction: These warblers live up to 5 years and build cup nests in branches.

Fun Fact: Despite their small size, they journey great distances during migration!

Hainan Partridge

Hainan Partridge

The Hainan Partridge, a ground-dwelling bird, roams the forests, camouflaged with earthy colors. It boasts intricate brown and black patterns and prefers dense forests and feeds on seeds and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage for seeds and insects on the forest floor in small groups.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Partridges live around 3-5 years and lay eggs in hidden nests.

Fun Fact: Their feathers help them blend perfectly into their surroundings!

Hainan Peacock-Pheasant

Hainan Peacock-Pheasant

The Hainan Peacock-Pheasant, with stunning feathers, struts through Hainan’s dense forests. It roams forest floors foraging for fruits and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They move gracefully, searching for fruits and insects on the forest floor.

Lifespan and Reproduction: These pheasants live around 10-15 years and lay eggs in concealed nests.

Fun Fact: Their vibrant plumage is used to attract mates during courtship displays!

Hair-Crested Drongo

Hair-Crested Drongo

The Hair-Crested Drongo, a glossy black bird with a fancy tuft, glides skillfully through Asian forests. With black plumage, it’s known for mimicking other bird calls.

Habitat and Behavior: It perches in treetops, mimicking sounds and catching insects with acrobatic flights.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Drongos live up to 10 years, building cup nests and laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: They’re expert tricksters, imitating other birds’ calls to confuse and steal food!

Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

The Hairy Woodpecker, with a red crown, taps rhythmically on trees across North America. This woodpecker has a checkered black-and-white pattern and excavates trees for insects and larvae.

Habitat and Behavior: They peck for insects in forests and drum loudly for communication.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Woodpeckers live around 4-12 years and excavate nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their strong beaks can peck up to 20 times per second!

Hairy-Backed Bulbul

Hairy-Backed Bulbul

The Hairy-Backed Bulbul, a songbird with streaked feathers, chirps melodiously in Southeast Asian forests. Characterized by its streaked plumage, it feeds on fruits and insects in forested areas.

Habitat and Behavior: They flit among trees, feasting on fruits and insects in small groups.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Bulbuls live up to 7-10 years, crafting cup nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their name comes from the streaked feathers on their backs!

Hairy-Breasted Barbet

Hairy-Breasted Barbet

The Hairy-Breasted Barbet, a colorful bird with a speckled chest, calls out in African forests. It forages in trees for fruits and insects with its stout bill.

Habitat and Behavior: They peck at fruits, perched on branches, and create echoing calls.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Barbets live around 8-12 years, nesting in tree holes.

Fun Fact: Their loud calls can be heard from far distances!

Hairy-Crested Antbird

Hairy-Crested Antbird

The Hairy-Crested Antbird, a small bird with a crest, hops stealthily in South American forests. It boasts a striking crest and primarily feeds on insects on the forest floor.

Habitat and Behavior: They skulk on the forest floor, following ant trails and catching insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Antbirds live up to 5-7 years, building nests low in bushes.

Fun Fact: They follow army ant swarms, feasting on insects flushed by them!

Half-Collared Kingfisher

Half-Collared Kingfisher

The Half-Collared Kingfisher, with blue and orange feathers, dives into African rivers hunting fish. It hunts for fish by freshwater bodies using its sharp beak.

Habitat and Behavior: It perches near water, swiftly diving to catch fish with its sharp beak.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Kingfishers live up to 6-9 years, nesting in riverbanks.

Fun Fact: They nest in tunnels dug into muddy riverbanks!

Half-Collared Sparrow

Half-Collared Sparrow

The Half-Collared Sparrow, a small bird with brown plumage, chirps in South American grasslands. It features a distinctive black and white collar around its neck.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage for seeds and insects in open areas, living in flocks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Sparrows live around 3-5 years, building nests in bushes.

Fun Fact: Their cheerful chirping can brighten up any day!

Hall’s Babbler

Hall’s Babbler

Hall’s Babbler, a small, brown bird found in Australia, hops among bushes with its mates. Hall’s Babbler lives in arid regions, often moving in family groups, feeding on insects and seeds.

Habitat and Behavior: They explore dense shrubs, searching for insects and communicating with cheerful calls.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Babblers live up to 4-6 years, creating dome-shaped nests in bushes.

Fun Fact: These birds have intricate social lives, often seen in groups!

Halmahera Boobook

Halmahera Boobook

The Halmahera Boobook, a nocturnal owl with dark eyes, roosts in Indonesian forests. It hunts insects and small mammals under the cover of night.

Habitat and Behavior: It hunts at night, swooping silently to catch insects and small animals.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Boobooks live up to 10-15 years, nesting in tree hollows.

Fun Fact: Their hoots sound like a soft, rhythmic “boobook” in the night!

Halmahera Cuckooshrike

Halmahera Cuckooshrike

The Halmahera Cuckooshrike, a black and white bird, flits among Indonesian trees, hunting insects. This cuckooshrike feeds on insects and occasionally fruit, inhabiting forests and woodlands.

Habitat and Behavior: They soar between branches, searching for insects and caterpillars to feed on.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Cuckoo shrikes live up to 5-8 years, building nests high in trees.

Fun Fact: They’re talented at catching prey mid-flight with their sharp beaks!

Halmahera Flowerpecker

Halmahera Flowerpecker

The Halmahera Flowerpecker, a tiny bird with colorful feathers, sips nectar from Indonesian flowers. It is a small bird with a colorful plumage. It feeds on nectar and fruits, often found in forested areas.

Habitat and Behavior: They hover near blossoms, drinking nectar and feeding on small insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Flowerpeckers live up to 4-6 years, crafting small cup nests.

Fun Fact: Their delicate size allows them to reach deep into flowers for nectar!

Halmahera Paradise-Crow

Halmahera Paradise-Crow

The Halmahera Paradise-Crow, with glossy black plumage, struts through Indonesian forests. It has glossy black plumage, and it roosts and forages in forests and edges.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage on the forest floor, searching for fruits, insects, and small animals.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Paradise crows live up to 10-15 years, building nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their deep, throaty calls echo through the forest, sounding majestic!

Halmahera Swiftlet

Halmahera Swiftlet

The Halmahera Swiftlet, a small bird with curved wings, darts swiftly through Indonesian skies. It nests in caves and cliffs and feeds on insects captured mid-air.

Habitat and Behavior: They roost in caves or hollows, catching insects while flying with impressive agility.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Swiftlets live up to 4-5 years, nesting high on cave walls.

Fun Fact: They use their saliva to build nests for their chicks!

Hamerkop

Hamerkop

The Hamerkop, with a unique hammer-shaped head, resides near African waterways. It is known for its hammer-shaped head, and builds large nests and hunts for fish and aquatic creatures.

Habitat and Behavior: They wade in water, using their beaks to catch fish, frogs, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hamerkops live up to 20 years, crafting large stick nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their nests can be as big as a small car!

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Hammond’s Flycatcher

Hammond’s Flycatcher, a small bird with olive-green feathers, flutters through North American forests. It’s often seen perching in trees while catching insects mid-air.

Habitat and Behavior: They perch in trees, darting out to catch insects with quick movements.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Flycatchers live up to 8-10 years, building cup nests in trees.

Fun Fact: They make tiny “peep” sounds to communicate with each other!

Handsome Flycatcher

Handsome Flycatcher

The Handsome Flycatcher, a colorful bird in shades of blue and yellow, flits gracefully through South American forests. It is often seen in forests catching insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They perch on branches, catching insects with swift aerial maneuvers.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Flycatchers live up to 4-6 years, nesting in tree hollows.

Fun Fact: They’re experts at catching insects mid-flight!

Handsome Fruiteater

Handsome Fruiteater

The Handsome Fruiteater, with vibrant plumage, feasts on fruits in South American mountain forests. This bird enjoys fruits and insects in the forest understory.

Habitat and Behavior: They hop among trees, devouring delicious fruits and occasionally insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Fruiteaters live up to 5-8 years, crafting cup nests in branches.

Fun Fact: Their vivid colors help them blend in with the colorful forest!

Handsome Spurfowl

Handsome Spurfowl

The Handsome Spurfowl, a ground-dwelling bird, scampers across African savannas and grasslands. It often forages on the ground for seeds and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage for seeds and insects, camouflaging among tall grasses.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Spurfowls live up to 4-6 years, nesting in shallow scrapes on the ground.

Fun Fact: Males attract mates by displaying their colorful spurs during courtship dances!

Handsome Sunbird

Handsome Sunbird

The Handsome Sunbird, with iridescent feathers, flits among Asian flowers sipping nectar. It is known for its iridescent plumage and love for nectar.

Habitat and Behavior: They hover near blossoms, using their curved beaks to drink nectar.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Sunbirds live up to 4-7 years, weaving hanging nests using grass and spider silk.

Fun Fact: Males have vibrant colors to impress females during courtship displays!

Hangnest Tody-Tyrant

Hangnest Tody-Tyrant

The Hangnest Tody-Tyrant, a small bird with a short tail, resides in South American forests. This bird in South America builds unique hanging nests and feeds on insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They perch in trees, flicking their tails while hunting for insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Today-Tyrants live up to 3-5 years, building hanging nests from moss and fibers.

Fun Fact: Their nests hang from branches, making them look like suspended pouches!

Happy Wren

Happy Wren

The Happy Wren, a small bird with a cheerful song, dances through Central and South American forests. It is known for its cheerful songs and is often found in dense vegetation.

Habitat and Behavior: They flit among trees, singing joyfully and searching for insects in foliage.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Wrens live up to 4-6 years, creating dome-shaped nests in shrubs.

Fun Fact: Their bubbly melodies can lift anyone’s spirits in the forest!

Hardhead

Hardhead

The Hardhead, a diving duck with a sturdy bill, paddles in Australian lakes and rivers. It usually dives for aquatic plants and invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: They dive underwater, feeding on aquatic plants and small invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hardheads live up to 10-15 years, nesting near water in dense vegetation.

Fun Fact: Their name comes from their tough, robust heads!

Harlequin Antbird

Harlequin Antbird

The Harlequin Antbird, a colorful bird, hops through South American forests in search of insects. This antbird has striking black-and-white patterns and forages on the forest floor.

Habitat and Behavior: They scurry on the forest floor, following ant swarms and snatching insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Antbirds live up to 5-8 years, building nests close to the ground.

Fun Fact: Their striking patterns make them look like forest jesters!

Harlequin Duck

Harlequin Duck

The Harlequin Duck, with striking colors like a painted masterpiece, swims in cold, fast-flowing North American rivers. It is a sea duck with bold markings, often seen swimming in fast-flowing rivers and coastal areas.

Habitat and Behavior: They dive underwater, foraging for aquatic insects and plants with their unique, serrated bills.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Harlequin ducks live around 10-15 years, nesting near fast-flowing rivers.

Fun Fact: They’re exceptional divers, plunging into swift currents with ease!

Harlequin Quail

Harlequin Quail

The Harlequin Quail, a small ground-dwelling bird, scurries through grasslands in Africa. This quail species in Africa prefers grasslands and scrub habitats, foraging for seeds and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage for seeds and insects, camouflaging among tall grasses.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Quails live up to 2-4 years, nesting in shallow depressions on the ground.

Fun Fact: Their patterned plumage helps them blend seamlessly into their grassy homes!

Harpy Eagle

Harpy Eagle

The Harpy Eagle, a majestic bird of prey, soars above South American rainforests. It is one of the largest and most powerful eagles. It inhabits forests and preys on mammals and birds.

Habitat and Behavior: They hunt for mammals and birds, nesting high in the tallest trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Harpy eagles live up to 25-35 years, building massive nests in tree canopies.

Fun Fact: Their strong talons are as long as a grizzly bear’s claws!

Harris’s Hawk

Harris’s Hawk

The Harris’s Hawk, a social raptor, patrols North and South American deserts and grasslands. It hunts in groups, and its social nature sets it apart from other raptors.

Habitat and Behavior: They hunt cooperatively in groups, preying on small mammals and reptiles.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hawks live up to 12-14 years, nesting in trees or cacti.

Fun Fact: They’re the only raptor known to hunt in packs!

Harris’s Sparrow

Harris’s Sparrow

The Harris’s Sparrow, a winter visitor to North America, sports a distinctive black bib. It is known for its distinctive black bib and crown, especially during breeding season.

Habitat and Behavior: They forage on the ground in brushy areas, feeding on seeds and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Sparrows live up to 7 years, nesting in the Arctic during summer.

Fun Fact: They breed farther north than any other North American sparrow!

Hartert’s Camaroptera

Hartert’s Camaroptera

Hartert’s Camaroptera is actually a small bird that can be found in Africa. It hides within dense foliage and loves fruits. This small bird resides in woodlands and thickets, foraging for insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They skulk in bushes, chirping softly and feeding on insects and fruits.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Camaropteras live up to 3-5 years, nesting in dense shrubs.

Fun Fact: Their calls sound like soft, melodious chatter!

Hartert’s Leaf Warbler

Hartert’s Leaf Warbler

Hartert’s Leaf Warbler is a unique migratory bird that flits through Asian forests during breeding season. It loves flitting among trees while searching for insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They explore tree canopies, gleaning insects from leaves.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Leaf warblers live up to 2-3 years, nesting in trees across Asia.

Fun Fact: Their small size makes them agile fliers among dense foliage!

Hartlaub’s Babbler

Hartlaub’s Babbler

The Hartlaub’s Babbler is a unique and widely recognized bird found in Africa. It usually moves in small groups through dense bushes. It moves in small groups through thickets, emitting a variety of calls.

Habitat and Behavior: They hop around low vegetation, foraging for insects and small fruits.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Babblers live up to 5-7 years, building cup nests in shrubs.

Fun Fact: Their cooperative behavior helps them find food efficiently!

Hartlaub’s Bustard

Hartlaub’s Bustard

Meet the Hartlaub’s Bustard! It is a round-dwelling bird found in Africa. It usually roams open savannas. It is known for its elaborate courtship displays during breeding season.

Habitat and Behavior: They strut and blend into grasslands, feeding on insects and seeds.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Bustards live up to 10-15 years, nesting in shallow scrapes on the ground.

Fun Fact: During courtship, males display by inflating throat sacs and raising white neck feathers!

Hartlaub’s Duck

Hartlaub’s Duck

Hartlaub’s Duck is an amazing bird species, found in southern Africa. It boasts its subtle yet elegant plumage. It frequents freshwater habitats, feeding on aquatic vegetation and small invertebrates.

Habitat and Behavior: They paddle in freshwater ponds and marshes, dabbling for aquatic plants and invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Ducks live up to 10-15 years, nesting near water in dense vegetation.

Fun Fact: They often hide their nests amid reeds or grasses!

Hartlaub’s Gull

Hartlaub’s Gull

Meet the Hartlaub’s Gull! It is a unique coastal bird in southern Africa. It usually flaunts a gray and white pattern. It is recognized by its black hood during breeding season.

Habitat and Behavior: They soar along coastlines, scavenging for fish and insects near water.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Gulls live up to 15-20 years, nesting in colonies on cliffs or islands.

Fun Fact: Their distinctive call sounds like a soft “kree-kree-kree.”

Hartlaub’s Spurfowl

Hartlaub’s Spurfowl

Hartlaub’s Spurfowl is a widely recognized African bird. This unique bird dashes through grasslands and scrub habitats. It is often seen in pairs or small groups.

Habitat and Behavior: They scuttle amidst bushes, foraging for seeds, fruits, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Spurfowls live up to 5-7 years, nesting in shallow scrapes on the ground.

Fun Fact: During courtship displays, males show off their spurs to impress females!

Hartlaub’s Turaco

Hartlaub’s Turaco

Hartlaub’s Turaco is a colorful bird that can be found in Africa. It leaps quite gracefully between trees. This vibrant and colorful bird in Africa is known for its distinct call and bright plumage.

Habitat and Behavior: They hop among branches, feeding on fruits and leaves.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Turacos live up to 10-12 years, nesting in trees with bulky stick nests.

Fun Fact: Their vibrant red wings make them stunning forest dwellers!

Harwood’s Spurfowl

Harwood’s Spurfowl

This unique bird is also known as Harwood’s Francolin, is actually a bird that belongs to the family Phasianidae. It is gray brown in color and has a red bill and tail. It is often spotted in grasslands and savannas, foraging for seeds and insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They live in acacia thickets, and these are hunted for food.

Lifespan and Reproduction: They live for several years and reproduce by laying eggs.

Fun Fact: Their food foraging occurs early morning and late afternoon.

Hauxwell’s Thrush

Hauxwell’s Thrush

This is a unique bird species that belongs to the family Turdidae. It is usually seen in Brazil, Bolivia, Peru, Ecuador, etc. It is characterized by its spotted plumage, often found in forests.

Habitat and Behavior: It usually lives in tropical or subtropical moist lowland forests.

Lifespan and Reproduction: It can live for several years and reproduce through laying eggs.

Fun Fact: They can create beautiful sounds!

Hawaiʻi ʻAkepa

Hawaiʻi ʻAkepa

The Hawaiʻi ʻAkepa, a small Hawaiian bird, sports vibrant orange plumage. This bird has a unique curved bill, and is often seen in high elevation forests.

Habitat and Behavior: They flit among trees, sipping nectar and eating insects in the forests of Hawaii.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ʻAkepas live up to 5-7 years, crafting cup-shaped nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their specialized bill helps them extract nectar from flowers!

Hawaiʻi ʻAmakihi

Hawaiʻi ʻAmakihi

The Hawaiʻi ʻAmakihi, another Hawaiian native, displays a yellow-green hue. It’s a small bird known for its yellow-green plumage and feeds on nectar.

Habitat and Behavior: They move through forests, foraging on nectar, fruits, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ʻAmakihis live up to 4-6 years, building cup nests in tree branches.

Fun Fact: They play a vital role in pollinating native Hawaiian plants!

Hawaiʻi Creeper

Hawaiʻi Creeper

The Hawaiʻi Creeper is actually a small bird in Hawaii that has a unique curved bill for probing. It usually loves foraging on tree trunks for insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They move methodically through forests, probing bark for insects and spiders.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Creepers live up to 5-8 years, crafting cup nests in tree branches.

Fun Fact: Their bills curve downward, allowing them to pry insects from tree bark!

Hawaiʻi ʻElepaio

Hawaiʻi ʻElepaio

The Hawaiʻi ʻElepaio, a Hawaiian flycatcher, zips through forests catching insects mid-air. This unique bird is widely known for its melodious song and insect-catching abilities.

Habitat and Behavior: They perch on branches, making quick flights to catch insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ʻElepaios live up to 4-6 years, building cup nests in trees.

Fun Fact: Their name means “the agile one” in Hawaiian!

Hawaii Mamo

Hawaii Mamo

The Hawaii Mamo, unfortunately extinct, was a striking black and yellow bird. It was known for its striking yellow feathers.

Habitat and Behavior: It resided in Hawaiian forests, feeding on nectar and small insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Mamos likely lived up to 5-7 years, nesting in trees.

Fun Fact: Its feathers were highly prized by native Hawaiians for ceremonial use.

Hawaiʻi ʻŌʻō

Hawaiʻi ʻŌʻō

The Hawaiʻi ʻŌʻō, another extinct Hawaiian bird, had glossy black plumage and vibrant yellow feathers. It was widely recognized for its bright plumage and unique vocalizations.

Habitat and Behavior: They inhabited forests, feeding on fruits and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ʻŌʻōs likely lived up to 5-8 years, building nests in trees.

Fun Fact: The last known individual of this species died in 1987.

Hawaiian Coot

Hawaiian Coot

The Hawaiian Coot, found in wetland habitats, is a waterbird with black and gray plumage. This unique bird is often found in freshwater habitats.

Habitat and Behavior: They swim and dive in marshes, feeding on aquatic plants and small invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Coots live up to 5-7 years, nesting near water in dense vegetation.

Fun Fact: Their large feet are adapted for paddling in water!

Hawaiian Crow

Hawaiian Crow

The Hawaiian Crow, or ʻAlalā, was a sleek, black bird with a curious and intelligent nature. Sadly it is now extinct in the wild but undergoing reintroduction efforts.

Habitat and Behavior: They inhabited forests, using tools to forage for insects, fruits, and nuts in Hawaiian trees.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ʻAlalā lived up to 5-7 years, nesting in tall trees, laying 2-5 eggs annually.

Fun Fact: They were known for their clever problem-solving skills and unique calls!

Hawaiian Duck

Hawaiian Duck

The Hawaiian Duck, or Koloa, was a colorful duck found in freshwater wetlands and rivers. It can be found in freshwater habitats, facing threats due to habitat loss and introduced predators.

Habitat and Behavior: They paddled in water, dabbling for aquatic plants, seeds, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Koloa lived up to 5-10 years, nesting in dense vegetation, laying 5-8 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their bills were adapted for straining food from water!

Hawaiian Hawk

Hawaiian Hawk

The Hawaiian Hawk, or ʻIo, soared majestically over Hawaiian landscapes with its brown plumage. It is revered in Hawaiian culture, and often seen soaring over open landscapes.

Habitat and Behavior: They soared in open areas, hunting for small mammals, birds, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: They lived up to 20-30 years, nesting in tall trees, laying 1-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: They were considered sacred by ancient Hawaiians!

Hawaiian Petrel

Hawaiian Petrel

The Hawaiian Petrel, or ʻUaʻu, was a seabird that nested in burrows on remote Hawaiian islands. This seabird nests in burrows on Hawaiian islands and is threatened by invasive species.

Habitat and Behavior: They soared over oceans, diving for fish and squid to feed their chicks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: ‘Uaʻus lived up to 25-35 years, nesting in burrows, laying a single egg.

Fun Fact: Their haunting calls were heard at night in breeding colonies!

Hawaiian Rail

Hawaiian Rail

The Hawaiian Rail, also famous as Kapaeʻōhiʻa, was a secretive bird living in Hawaiian wetlands and grasslands. It is known for its distinctive red bill and legs, and found in wetland habitats.

Habitat and Behavior: They hid in dense vegetation, foraging for insects, seeds, and small invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Kapaeʻōhiʻas lived up to 3-5 years, nesting in marshy areas, laying 2-5 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their secretive nature made them elusive and rarely seen by people!

Hawfinch

Hawfinch

The Hawfinch, a robust bird, flaunts a powerful beak for cracking seeds and nuts. It is recognized by its large bill used for cracking hard seeds.

Habitat and Behavior: They dwell in woodlands, using their sturdy bills to extract seeds and fruits.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hawfinches live up to 8-12 years, nesting in trees, laying 3-5 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their beak can exert enough pressure to crack open cherry stones!

Hawkins’s Rail

Hawkins’s Rail

This unique bird has been extinct recently. It was a large weka-like bird that had quite a long down-curved bill. This bird is the only member of the genus Diaphorapteryx.

Habitat and Behavior: It became extinct due to overhunting and hence most information about this bird is unknown. It loved to probe decaying wood for invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Much about this extinct bird is not known.

Fun Fact: It was the largest terrestrial bird that resided in the Chatham Islands!

Hazel Grouse

Hazel Grouse

The Hazel Grouse, a woodland bird, sports intricate patterns and a reddish plumage. It is often seen on the forest floor foraging for buds and berries.

Habitat and Behavior: They inhabit forests, feeding on buds, leaves, and berries on the forest floor.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Grouses live up to 3-4 years, nesting on the ground, laying 4-6 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their cryptic plumage helps them blend seamlessly into their woodland homes!

Hazel-fronted Pygmy Tyrant

Hazel-Fronted Pygmy Tyrant

The Hazel-fronted Pygmy Tyrant, a tiny bird, flits through South American forests. It is widely known for its quick movements while catching insects.

Habitat and Behavior: They zip among trees, catching insects with rapid flights and sharp beaks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Pygmy tyrants live up to 2-3 years, nesting in trees, laying 2-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: Despite their small size, they’re skilled hunters of insects!

Heard Island Shag

Heard Island Shag

The Heard Island Shag, a seabird, inhabits the chilly waters around subantarctic islands. It is known for its distinctive appearance and feeding habits in marine environments.

Habitat and Behavior: They dive in icy waters, feeding on fish and marine invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Shags live up to 15-20 years, nesting on cliffs or rocky areas.

Fun Fact: Their waterproof feathers keep them warm in frigid Antarctic waters!

Heart-spotted Woodpecker

Heart-Spotted Woodpecker

The Heart-spotted Woodpecker, a charming bird, roams South American forests with its distinctive heart-shaped spots. It is known for its striking red crown and heart-shaped spots on its back.

Habitat and Behavior: They cling to tree trunks, drumming and pecking for insects with their sturdy beaks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Woodpeckers live up to 4-6 years, excavating nests in trees, laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their drumming echoes through the forest like rhythmic music!

Heermann’s Gull

Heermann’s Gull

Heermann’s Gull, a coastal bird, displays a striking combination of gray and white plumage. It has striking grey plumage and distinctive red beak and legs.

Habitat and Behavior: They soar over coastal waters, diving for fish and scavenging for food.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Gulls live up to 20-25 years, nesting in colonies on coastal islands.

Fun Fact: Their breeding grounds can be found in Mexico!

Heinroth’s Shearwater

Heinroth’s Shearwater

Heinroth’s Shearwater, a seabird, navigates the ocean, gracefully gliding over waves. It is known for its remarkably long wings and breeding colonies on remote islands.

Habitat and Behavior: They plunge into the sea, feeding on fish and squid with their hooked bills.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Shearwaters live up to 20-30 years, nesting in burrows on remote islands.

Fun Fact: Their haunting calls are heard over the open sea!

Hellmayr’s Pipit

Hellmayr’s Pipit

Hellmayr’s Pipit is a really cute and small songbird. It usually hops through grasslands and open areas in South America. It is known for its streaked appearance and preference for grasslands and agricultural areas

Habitat and Behavior: They forage for insects and seeds on the ground, moving in a distinctive hopping motion.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Pipits live up to 3-5 years, nesting in grassy areas, laying 3-5 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their streaked plumage camouflages them perfectly in grassy habitats!

Helmet Vanga

Helmet Vanga

The Helmet Vanga, a unique bird in Madagascar, sports a distinctive casque on its bill. It has a distinctive crest and is known for its foraging habits in forests.

Habitat and Behavior: They move through forests, using their casque to probe for insects in bark.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Vangas live up to 8-10 years, nesting in tree cavities, laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their bill’s casque amplifies their calls in the dense forests!

Helmeted Curassow

Helmeted Curassow

The Helmeted Curassow, a majestic bird of South American forests, flaunts a striking black crest atop its head. This large bird has a striking appearance with a distinctive casque on its head.

Habitat and Behavior: They roam dense tropical forests, foraging for fruits, seeds, and insects on the forest floor.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Curassows live up to 15-25 years, laying eggs in nests hidden among foliage, usually producing 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their loud calls echo through the forest, alerting others about predators!

Helmeted Friarbird

Helmeted Friarbird

The Helmeted Friarbird, an Australian native, showcases a distinct casque-like growth on its bill. It has a helmet-like patch on its head and a loud, melodious call.

Habitat and Behavior: They frequent woodlands and gardens, feeding on nectar, fruits, and insects.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Friarbirds live up to 8-12 years, nesting in trees, typically laying 1-2 eggs.

Fun Fact: They are talented mimics, imitating other bird calls and sounds!

Helmeted Guineafowl

Helmeted Guineafowl

The Helmeted Guineafowl, a ground-dwelling bird in Africa, dons a helmet-like casque on its head. It is recognized by its striking appearance with a bony casque on its head and loud calls.

Habitat and Behavior: They inhabit savannas and grasslands, foraging for seeds, insects, and small reptiles.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Guineafowls live up to 10-15 years, laying eggs in shallow scrapes, typically producing 6-12 eggs.

Fun Fact: They can fly short distances and are great runners, scurrying away when threatened!

Helmeted Hornbill

Helmeted Hornbill

The Helmeted Hornbill, a majestic bird of Southeast Asian forests, sports a casque atop its bill. It has a unique helmet-like casque on its bill and is critically endangered due to poaching.

Habitat and Behavior: They fly high in tropical forests, feeding on fruits and small animals.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hornbills live up to 35-50 years, nesting in tree hollows, laying 1-2 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their casque is solid and used in head-to-head combat with rivals!

Helmeted Manakin

Helmeted Manakin

The Helmeted Manakin, found in Central and South American forests, features a bright head plumage. It is known for its vibrant colors and displays during mating season.

Habitat and Behavior: They dart among trees, performing elaborate courtship dances to attract mates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Manakins live up to 6-8 years, nesting in low vegetation, laying 2 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their flashy dances involve high-speed wing snaps to impress females!

Helmeted Myna

Helmeted Myna

The Helmeted Myna, a glossy black bird with a distinct yellow helmet-like crest, resides in Southeast Asia. This myna species showcases a black crest and is known for its loud calls.

Habitat and Behavior: They inhabit forests and urban areas, scavenging for fruits, insects, and small animals.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Mynas live up to 8-12 years, nesting in tree cavities, laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their knack for mimicking sounds includes imitating human speech and other birds!

Helmeted Pygmy-Tyrant

Helmeted Pygmy-Tyrant

The Helmeted Pygmy Tyrant, a tiny bird of South America, boasts a distinctive head plume. It is known for its small size and insectivorous diet.

Habitat and Behavior: They flit through forests, capturing insects in mid-air with quick aerial maneuvers.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Pygmy tyrants live up to 2-4 years, nesting in small cup-shaped nests, laying 2-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their quick, darting flights make them skilled hunters of insects!

Helmeted Woodpecker

Helmeted Woodpecker

The Helmeted Woodpecker, a bird with a striking red crest, roams through South American forests. It has a distinctive red crest and black-and-white plumage.

Habitat and Behavior: They drum on tree trunks, searching for insects under bark and feeding on sap.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Woodpeckers live up to 7-10 years, nesting in tree cavities, laying 2-5 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their rhythmic drumming can be heard resonating through the woods!

Hemprich’s Hornbill

Hemprich’s Hornbill

Hempich’s Hornbill is a large bird that can be seen in Africa. It sports a prominent casque atop its bill. It has a distinctive red throat patch and is found in woodlands and forests.

Habitat and Behavior: They soar above forests, dining on fruits, insects, and small reptiles.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Hornbills live up to 30-40 years, nesting in tree cavities, laying 1-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their calls sound like a mixture of laughter and cackling!

Hen Harrier

Hen Harrier

The Hen Harrier is actually a bird of prey found in open fields and marshes. It displays a distinctive white rump in flight. It hunts low over fields and marshes for small mammals and birds.

Habitat and Behavior: They glide low over grasslands, hunting small mammals and birds.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Harriers live up to 5-10 years, nesting on the ground in dense vegetation, laying 4-6 eggs.

Fun Fact: They are known for their remarkable agility during hunting, flying low to surprise prey!

Henderson Crake

Henderson Crake

The Henderson Crake, a secretive bird, dwells on Henderson Island, displaying olive-brown plumage with subtle markings. This flightless bird can be seen in the remote Henderson Island, which is part of the Pitcairn Islands, and is critically endangered.

Habitat and Behavior: They hide in dense vegetation near freshwater, foraging for insects, small invertebrates, and seeds.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Crakes live up to 4-5 years, nesting in marshy areas, laying 2-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their cryptic plumage helps them blend into their surroundings effortlessly!

Henderson Fruit Dove

Henderson Fruit Dove

The Henderson Fruit Dove, a colorful bird, inhabits Henderson Island, showcasing vibrant green and purple feathers. It has a colorful plumage and preference for forested habitats.

Habitat and Behavior: They roost in trees, feeding on fruits, berries, and seeds in the island’s forests.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Fruit doves live up to 8-10 years, nesting in trees, laying 1-2 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their melodious calls echo through the forest canopy!

Henderson Petrel

Henderson Petrel

The Henderson Petrel, a seabird, nests on Henderson Island, boasting gray and white plumage with dark markings.

Habitat and Behavior: They soar over oceans, diving for fish and squid to feed their chicks.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Petrels live up to 30-40 years, nesting in burrows, laying a single egg.

Fun Fact: Their eerie calls pierce the night over the island!

Henderson Reed Warbler

Henderson Reed Warbler

The Henderson Reed Warbler, a small bird, inhabits the island, sporting brown plumage and a slender bill.

Habitat and Behavior: They flit among reeds and bushes, hunting for insects and small invertebrates.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Reed warblers live up to 3-4 years, nesting low in vegetation, laying 2-4 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their cheerful chirps fill the island’s marshy areas!

Henderson’s Ground Jay

Henderson’s Ground Jay

This unique bird species is also famous as Mongolian ground jay. It is a bird species that belongs to the family Corvidae. It is light tan in color with an iridescent blue color on its primary feathers.

Habitat and Behavior: It is found in the arid regions of Central Asia and eats common lizards, small invertebrates, etc.

Lifespan and Reproduction: They live for several years and reproduce by laying eggs.

Fun Fact: These are sedentary birds!

Henst’s Goshawk

Henst’s Goshawk

This unique bird of prey belongs to the family Accipitridae. It is quite large, and a diurnal bird that can be seen in the island of Madagascar. It is recognized by its gray plumage and distinctive call.

Habitat and Behavior: It lives in forests and are rarely seen. It usually lives in tropical or subtropical dry forest, or moist montane forest.

Lifespan and Reproduction: They can create large nests and live for several years. They lay two eggs in a clutch.

Fun Fact: Their basic call sounds like “ang-ang-ang-ang…”

Henna-capped Foliage-gleaner

Henna-Capped Foliage-Gleaner

This bird is a species found in South America, displaying earthy plumage with a reddish cap. It has a distinctive henna-colored cap, often foraging for insects in forests.

Habitat and Behavior: They navigate through forests, gleaning insects and small invertebrates from foliage.

Lifespan and Reproduction: Foliage-gleaners live up to 5-7 years, nesting in tree cavities or branches, laying 2-3 eggs.

Fun Fact: Their distinct cap coloration helps them blend into the forest canopy!

Some more birds’ name starting with letter H

Birds That Start With H
Hildebrandt’s starlingHoffmanns’s woodcreeperHorned parakeet
Hill blue flycatcherHofmann’s sunbirdHorned puffin
Hill partridgeHolub’s golden weaverHorned screamer
Hill pigeonHombron’s kingfisherHorned sungem
Hill priniaHonduran emeraldHorsfield’s babbler
Hill swallowHoneyguide greenbulHorsfield’s bronze cuckoo
Himalayan beautiful rosefinchHood mockingbirdHorsfield’s bush lark
Himalayan black-lored titHooded antpittaHorus swift
Himalayan bluetailHooded berryeaterHose’s broadbill
Himalayan bulbulHooded butcherbirdHose’s partridge
Himalayan buzzardHooded craneHoubara bustard
Himalayan cuckooHooded crowHouse bunting
Himalayan cutiaHooded cuckooshrikeHouse crow
Himalayan flamebackHooded dotterelHouse finch
Himalayan monalHooded gnateaterHouse sparrow
Himalayan owlHooded grebeHouse swift
Himalayan priniaHooded grosbeakHouse wren
Himalayan quailHooded mannikinHuallaga tanager
Himalayan rubythroatHooded merganserHuayco tinamou
Himalayan shortwingHooded monarchHudsonian godwit
Himalayan shrike-babblerHooded mountain tanagerHudsonian whimbrel
Himalayan snowcockHooded mountain toucanHudson’s black tyrant
Himalayan swiftletHooded orioleHudson’s canastero
Himalayan thrushHooded parrotHuet’s fulvetta
Himalayan vultureHooded pitohuiHuia
Himalayan white-browed rosefinchHooded pittaHumaita antbird
Himalayan woodpeckerHooded robinHumblot’s flycatcher
Hinde’s babblerHooded siskinHumblot’s heron
Hispaniolan amazonHooded tanagerHumblot’s sunbird
Hispaniolan crossbillHooded tinamouHumboldt penguin
Hispaniolan emeraldHooded treepieHumboldt’s sapphire
Hispaniolan lizard cuckooHooded visorbearerHume’s bush warbler
Hispaniolan nightjarHooded vultureHume’s hawk-owl
Hispaniolan orioleHooded warblerHume’s leaf warbler
Hispaniolan palm crowHooded wheatearHume’s short-toed lark
Hispaniolan parakeetHooded whistlerHume’s treecreeper
Hispaniolan peweeHooded yellowthroatHume’s wheatear
Hispaniolan spindalisHook-billed bulbulHume’s white-eye
Hispaniolan trogonHook-billed hermitHume’s whitethroat
Hispaniolan woodpeckerHook-billed kingfisherHunstein’s mannikin
Hoary pufflegHook-billed kiteHunter’s cisticola
Hoary-headed grebeHook-billed vangaHunter’s sunbird
Hoary-throated barwing†Hoopoe starlingHuon astrapia
Hoary-throated spinetailHornbill friarbirdHuon catbird
HoatzinHornby’s storm petrelHuon melidectes
Hodgson’s frogmouthHorned cootHutton’s shearwater
Hodgson’s hawk-cuckooHorned curassowHutton’s vireo
Hodgson’s redstartHorned grebeHyacinth macaw
Hodgson’s treecreeperHorned guanHyacinth visorbearer
Hoffmann’s woodpeckerHorned larkHylocitrea
Henna-hooded Foliage-gleanerHermit WarblerHeuglin’s White-eye
Henslow’s SparrowHermit Wood WrenHighland Elaenia
Hepatic TanagerHeuglin’s BustardHighland Guan
Herald PetrelHeuglin’s Masked WeaverHighland Rush Warbler
Herero ChatHeuglin’s SpurfowlHighland Tinamou
Hermit ThrushHeuglin’s WheatearHildebrandt’s Spurfowl

Conclusion

Wasn’t that a truly interesting journey through the fantastic birds that start with the letter H??

So, just remain with us while we are exploring these amazing facts about the kingdom of birds!! We will meet soon with some other unique creatures!!

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